Blood Orange and Almond Cake

Blood Orange and Almond Cake

Our team at Ta’amim have drawn inspiration from the Tu B’Shevat seder to create a beautifully moist blood orange, olive oil and almond cake, topped with fruit and a blood orange and cardamom syrup. Olives

Sweet Potato and Squash Chips

Sweet Potato and Squash Chips - Image by Yaffa Judah

Root vegetables are a seasonal staple for Sukkot and Rosh Hashana, as well as a Pesach-friendly side and an alternative to white potatoes. These sweet vegetables are also ideal for Rosh Hashana, where we have the custom to eat sweet foods for a “good and sweet new year,” and we eat gourds such as squash as one of the Simanim, representing our desire that, if it be Hashem’s will, that the evil of our verdicts be torn apart, and that our merits be announced before Him.

Classic Chicken Soup

Chicken Soup with Kneidlach (Matzah Balls)

Often referred to as Jewish penicillin, there are few dishes more iconic in the Jewish repertoire than this Ashkenazic Friday Night staple, served with kneidlach (matzah balls) or lokshen (noodles). There are an infinite number of minor tweaks to this recipe from the addition of tomatoes and dill to arguments about clarity, but what we can all agree upon is that if your mum ever made chicken soup for you when you were sick then you will insist forevermore that hers is, was and always will be the best, and nobody will ever convince you otherwise. We’re okay with that, because our mums all made the best soup, too!

Root Vegetable Medley

Roasted Root Vegetable Medley

This light, flavourful vegetable dish makes an excellent lunch as a side or as a salad, and is great served hot or cold. You can leave the feta out and use our Parev, Kosher for Passover Pesto to make the recipe vegan and Pesach-friendly.

Vegetable Frittata

Vegetable Frittata

This light, flavourful vegetable dish makes an excellent lunch as a side or as a salad, and is great served hot or cold. You can leave the feta out and use our Parev, Kosher for Passover Pesto to make the recipe vegan and Pesach-friendly.

Honey and Ginger Salmon with Asian Slaw

Honey and Ginger Salmon with Asian Slaw

Earthy freshness from parsley, vibrancy from mint and refreshing aniseed notes from tarragon, all lifted with the zesty citrus burst of lemon, mean that this flavourful dressing (as the name suggests) works with everything. Almost. You may not want it in your tea, and it might taste a bit funny on chocolate mousse, but it can add vibrancy to meat, fish, vegetables, salads and even – if you’re feeling bold – fruit (as a sweet and tangy salsa or a melon starter)!

Herb and Citrus Everything Dressing

Herb and Citrus Everything Dressing

Earthy freshness from parsley, vibrancy from mint and refreshing aniseed notes from tarragon, all lifted with the zesty citrus burst of lemon, mean that this flavourful dressing (as the name suggests) works with everything. Almost. You may not want it in your tea, and it might taste a bit funny on chocolate mousse, but it can add vibrancy to meat, fish, vegetables, salads and even – if you’re feeling bold – fruit (as a sweet and tangy salsa or a melon starter)!

Kosher for Passover Salad Dressings

Kosher for Passover Salad Dressings

If vinegar or mustard feature in your go-to salad dressings, then Pesach might pose a challenge for you! Although some wine and cider vinegars are available at Passover, they can be costly, and if you don’t live near a Kosher superstore, they may be hard to procure. But don’t panic – we’ve got you covered. Fresh citrus can provide much-needed acidity, vibrancy and even sweetness at a fraction of the cost. Below are some of our favourite KfP salad dressings.

Ratatouille

Ratatouille

Originating in the French city of Nice in the late 19th century, ratatouille is a Provençal peasant dish of stewed vegetables – traditionally aubergine, courgette and pepper cooked in a tomato base with regional herbs. Although the earliest record of ratatouille dates back less than 150 years, there are a great many variations in cooking technique. According to the noted encyclopedia of gastronomy, Larousse Gastronomique, purists claim that each vegetable should be cooked separately and then combined, so that each retains its own flavour.